As the economy improves, the divorce rate rises

As the economy recovers, divorce is making a comeback, too. Many are surprised to learn that the divorce rate declined as the recession kicked in. While it is largely undisputed that financial turmoil places strain on a marriage, couples appear to be waiting until they are more financially secure before getting out of marriage.

According to a sociologist from the University of Maryland, about 150,000 fewer dissolutions occurred than otherwise anticipated between the years 2009 and 2010. The divorce rate among married women dropped from 2008 to 2009; however, it steadily climbed in both 2010 and 2011. While some had believed that the recession brought struggling couples closer, some sociologists suspect that couples purely waited until they could afford a split.

Moreover, this happened in the past, according to a sociologist from Johns Hopkins University. In the 1930s, people chose to stay in shoddy marriages because they simply could not afford to get divorced. On the other hand, researchers are cautious of the numbers. For example, studies suggest that the unemployment rate during the recent recession had no impact on divorce; yet, throughout the Great Depression, unemployment numbers did affect dissolution rates.

At any rate, prior studies suggest that marriages are less likely to survive low incomes and lesser-educated couples, so the new numbers are a little bizarre. If money strains a relationship, why would couples begin divorcing when the economy is turning up? As a result, more research is needed to understand the relationship between money and divorce.

Divorce in Arizona

Regardless of the economy's status, divorce is never easy. It can always be financially straining - even when the economy is in good shape. If you are at the point in your relationship where enough is enough, the first step is to retain legal assistance.

There are so many complexities involved in the process of divorce. Many settlements involve the following:

  • Property division
  • Legal Decision-Making (Custody) (now called legal decision-making in Arizona) and child visitation (parenting time)
  • Child support
  • Spousal support

At the end of the day, all of these topics in some way involve financial issues. Therefore, it helps to have an expert by your side. A lawyer can use his or her resources to assess each and every concern that you have.

It is not easy to move forward after a divorce. This is especially true when changes will force you to be on your own. To help ensure that your transition into a new life is manageable, speak with a legal professional.